Thursday, May 30, 2013

Fashion Design Drawing Lesson - Anarkali Suit Priyanka Chopra MANISH MALHOTRA FASHION SHOW 2012:

Fashion Design Drawing Lesson

PENGUIN NEW TITLE

ISBN13
name
AUTHOR1
currency
price
ORDER QTY
PUBLISHER
BINDINGTYPE
CATEGORY
SUBJECT
9780448463322
Who Is Bill Gates ?
Demuth, Patricia Brennan
INR
199

Grosset & Dunlap
Paperback
ADULT OTHER
BIOGRAPHY
9780143417361
War Journey
Malaravan
INR
250

PENGUIN INDIA
Paperback
Non Fiction
WAR
9781591845959
Revolution in a Bottle
Tom Szaky
INR
599

PENGUIN PORTFOLIO
Paperback
ADULT BUSINESS
BIOGRAPHY
9780143415558
Its a City-Showmans Show (Black Classic)
Anandghan
INR
299

PENGUIN INDIA
Paperback
Others
CLASSIC
9780571280018
The Chemistry of Tears
Carey, Peter
INR
350

FABER
Paperback
Fiction
FICTION
9780452298170
The Art of Doing l
Sweeney Camille
INR
599

PLUME
Paperback
Others
SELF HELP
9781591845997
Nothing to Lose, Everything to Gain
Blair, Ryan
INR
650

PENGUIN PORTFOLIO
Paperback
Business & Management
BIOGRAPHY
9781409331131
The Rough Guide to the iPhone (5)
NA
INR
499

DK-ADULT
Paperback


9781409328889
Superman the Ultimate Guide to the Man of Steel
NA
INR
999

DK CHILDREN
Hardback


9781409330356
Little Hide and Seek Playtime
NA
INR
199

DK CHILDREN
Board Book



Sunday, May 26, 2013

Austrian slackliner Reinhard Kleindl



LIVING ON THE EDGE: Austrian slackliner Reinhard Kleindl balances on a cord between the two towers of ‘Tower 185’ as part of the skyscraper festival in Frankfurt, Germany, on Saturday

Laburnum and Peltophorum, the flaming red flowers of Gulmohar

SUMMER SHOWS ITS TRUE COLOURS



    Even as Mumbai reels under the blazing summer, flowering trees lend the city their bright and vibrant hues—especially yellows, violets and reds. While yellow flowers have bloomed on trees like Laburnum and Peltophorum, the flaming red flowers of Gulmohar are also making their presence felt in Mumbai, said botanist Nudrat Sayed. TOI features some of the trees that are currently in full bloom and have painted the town in various shades

JARUL (Scientific name: Lagerstroemia Speciosa)
    
Jarul is also known as the ‘Pride of India’ and locally as ‘Tamhaan’ (in Marathi). It is currently in bloom with lovely violet flowers. The tree is also known for its medical properties as it can be used to treat high blood pressure and cholesterol. Jarul is also seen in the Western Ghats and can be 30-ft to 40-ft tall.


COPPER POD
(Scientific name: Peltophorum Pterocarpum)
    
This upright, handsome and semi-evergreen tree has a rounded canopy that showers yellow flowers during summer. The tree’s dark green, delicate, feathery leaflets provide a softening effect for the tree’s large size and create a welcoming, dappled shade. From May to September, the entire canopy of copper pods is covered with a yellow blanket of flowers, appearing in showy, terminal panicles and exuding a delicious, grape-like perfume. These trees are seen prominently in Mumbai and its suburbs.


GULMOHAR
(Scientific name: Delonix Regia)
    
Delonix Regia is noted for its fernlike leaves and flamboyant display of red-orange flowers. It is widely cultivated for its ornamental value and can be used as a refuge from heat especially in hot and tropical conditions. The compound leaves have a feathery appearance and are a characteristic light and bright green in colour. Gulmohar flowers are large with four spreading scarlet or orange-red petals that are up to 8-cm long. During the peak of summer, i.e. in May, the flaming red flowers make Gulmohar look like a ‘tree on fire’.


INDIAN LABURNUM
(Scientific name: Cassia Fistula)
    
With its radiant bright yellow flowers that delicately dangle from its branches, the Indian Laburnum is the season’s show-stopper. Cassia Fistula is widely grown as an ornamental plant in tropical and subtropical areas. It blooms in late spring. The Indian Laburnum flowers profusely, covering the entire tree in a yellow blanket and many a time, no leaf can be spotted.

40% of Mumbai suicides due to family issues, illnesses second

40% of Mumbai suicides due to family issues, illnesses second

Trends Are Similar Across State And Nation 

    Four out of every 10 suicides in Mumbai from 2007 to 2011 were due to family problems, according to data from the National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB). Similarly, 36% of suicides across the state during the same period were due to family problems. The trend was nationwide, with domestic issues being the main cause of suicides in high-incidence cities like Bangalore, Chennai and Delhi, and states like Tamil Nadu and West Bengal.
    Illness was the next major reason, accounting for nearly 30% of the suicides in Mumbai and 27% in Maharashtra. Sim
ilarly, in cities like Bangalore Chennai and Delhi, and states like Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh, West Bengal and Karnataka, illness was a major cause of suicides. In fact, in Karnataka and AP it outweighed family problems.
    While the male-female divide wasn’t significant in overall suicides in Mumbai (3,306 by men compared to 2,350 by women), in the state over twothirds of suicides were by men (52,830 as compared to 24,770).
    There were 2,259 suicides due to family problems in Mumbai, with 1,152 by men and 1,107 by women. Another 134 suicides in Mumbai were due to dowry issues, with all these deaths involving women. In Maharashtra, 28,202 suicides were due to family problems, with 17,076 by men and 11,126 by women. Another 1,265 suicides were due to dowry issues, with 11 of them involving men.
    Psychiatrists say a wide range of problems have their repercussions at home -- like financial problems, difficulties
in relationships, long working hours, shrinking social support and skyrocketing prices. “The pace of life is causing a disconnect and isolation, leading to depression and suicide. The ‘disconnection syndrome’ could be worse than HIV. Lack of emotional contact leads to distress, depression and suicide. Family contact time has also shrunk,” said psychiatrist Dr Harish Shetty. Shetty added that social chaos has increased stress and depression within families.
    Shetty said the age for the onset of depression has come down, with even kids suffering from the syndrome. “The three ‘S’s, as in the ‘three schools’ phenomena, is largely responsible -- school, tuitions and studies at home. Severe anxiety as a result of exam stress or poor marks is also a major cause. Lack of play and relaxation has caused a pressure cooker for kids,” he said.
    Suicidal people hope for an
alternative, but can’t see one. That’s why it is imperative to help them, said deputy commissioner of police (Zone V) Dhananjay Kulkarni. Dealing with suicidal people is not easy, but possible, said state director general of police Sanjeev Dayal. Suicidal tendencies should be recognized and tackled with effective interventions, he said.
    Other major reasons for suicides in Mumbai include work-related reasons (unem
ployment, career problems and bankruptcy), drug or alcohol addiction and love affairs. While a majority of work-related and drug or alcohol suicides are by men, women account for more suicides due to exam pressure, cancelled marriages and lack of children.
    The illnesses that cause depression and lead to suicide include AIDS, cancer and paralysis. Mental health issues and prolonged illness also cause suicidal tendencies.

Alcohol, career
take toll on city
Two categories in which Mumbai led other major suicide-incidence cities – Bangalore, Chennai and Delhi – were drug/alcohol problems and career issues. There were 259 and 103 suicides, respectively, in Mumbai due to these reasons from 2007 to 2011. Meanwhile, the city was placed second for suicides due to unemployment (321).
    Suicidal tendencies are often related to drugs and alcohol, with some people becoming maudlin and impulsively attempting to end their lives, said psychiatrist Dr Yusuf Matcheswalla. A dialogue should be initiated with such people, he said.
Maharashtra tops among states Bangalore recorded the most suicides in India, with 10,487 deaths from 2007 to 2011. Chennai was second with 8,786 suicides, Delhi third with 6,185 and Mumbai fourth with 5,656. Among states, Maharashtra topped the list with 77,600 suicides, followed closely by West Bengal (76,886), Tamil Nadu (75,144), Andhra Pradesh (74,714) and Karnataka (62,062).


Tuesday, May 21, 2013

Pawar sees solution ahead of Friday meet with CM

Pawar sees solution ahead of Friday meet with CM
The traders’ associations met Union minster and NCP president Sharad Pawar on Sunday and urged him to intervene to resolve the stand-off between them and the state government over Local Body Tax (LBT).
“We explained to him that the shopkeepers have been unnecessarily asked to register to file returns even if they buy goods in the city limits only,” said Viren Shah, president of Federation of Retail Traders’ Welfare Association (FRTWA).
He added that the traders are ready to pay tax but they refuse to go for another registration and additional assessing authority. “He has assured us that the issue would be resolved in a meeting on May 24 which will be attended by the chief minister and other government officials,” said Shah.
He added that we suggested that the assessment can be done by the sale tax department. “Because, many complaints have been registered in this regard in many municipal corporations since they are not experienced enough to do proper assessment,”said Shah.
Meanwhile, the Food and Civil Supplies department of state government has issued notices on Friday to over 100 traders under the Essential Services Maintenance Act (ESMA) asking to give reply within three days threatening to cancel registration. “We have given them our reply and seeking an hearing before they take any call,” said Mohan Gurnani, president of the Federation of Associations of Maharashtra (FAM), who also received the notice.
The FAM office-bearers also met Pawar on Sunday. “We have explained him in detail about the issues over the LBT and about our strike for the past 27 days. He has agreed to our issues, assuring us that it will be looked into soon,” said Vinesh Mehta, treasurer of FAM.
Sharad pawar in mumbai local railway

How scarring can names be? Ask Aurangzeb

How scarring can names be? Ask Aurangzeb
Mumbai: He laughs shyly at first and then uproariously. Almost doubling over, the cabbie mops his eyes with his sleeves, pointing to gigantic movie hoardings at the Mahim church signal. No, it isn’t an angry Arjun Kapoor staring at himself in a mirror that has him in splits; it is the film’s name — Aurangzeb.
“Finally, I feel vindicated about my name after so many years,” he smiles.
The 34-year-old resident of Behrampada in Bandra (E) explains that giving out his name — Aurangzeb Alamgir Mansoor Syed — to people has sent spasms of fear down his spine all through his life. “I was named by a pir in my native village in Jalgaon district, who told my parents that it meant ‘the pride of throne.’ My illiterate parents thought nothing of the name till I began going to school,” he adds.
School years, especially classes IV and VI, were cruel.
“We stayed at Chembur then. In school, the history books portrayed Aurangzeb as an anti-Hindu tyrant. Since most of my classmates and the teacher were Hindus, I was subjected to jibes in class and teasing during the breaks. This led to many nasty fights,” recalls Syed.
The vilifying of Aurangzeb as one who vandalised temples, enforced the punitive jizya tax on Hindu pilgrims, imprisoned Shivaji, and tortured and killed his son, Sambhaji, had such a damaging effect several centuries later that the Mughal emperor’s namesake was forced to drop out of school in Class VII.
“After the first round of riots in December 1992, our Hindu-majority locality became unsafe. We moved in with my maternal uncle’s family at Behrampada. Later, my father invested in a small kholi, where I still live.”
It was during this break from schooling that Syed decided that he didn’t want to go back to the rigamarole of teasing and fighting at school. “I was determined not to let all of that happen again, and braved ammi’s shouting and abba’s thrashing to stay away from the local school they put me in.”
After apprenticing at his uncle’s garage for a few years, he began driving a taxi. “I realised that I was not cut out to work for someone. Sure, the taxi-line has its own problems, but at least I’m on my own.”
Afzal Khan knows what Syed feels like. The garment trader from a chawl in the Bandra-Kurla Complex shares his name with a medieval Indian commander who served the Adil Shahi dynasty of Bijapur and fought against Shivaji.
“Perhaps, things wouldn’t have been this bad if I had just his first name or his surname. Put together, the name was devastating. I went through school cringing at barbs, many of which were communal,” says the Class XII dropout. “Each time I complained, I ended up being punished, along with those who teased me.”
Khan, who hails from Aurangabad, changed many jobs and businesses before settling into garment retail.
But the journey for Khan hasn’t been completely bitter. The memory of a particular incident associated with his name still cracks him up. He was working as a satellite van driver for a TV news channel during the communal flare-up in 1992 when Hindu organisations objected to an “encroachment by the Afzal Khan Trust at Pratapgad,” where the Bijapur general had battled Shivaji in 1659.
“We were at the site with the reporter and the cameraperson. The Satara collectorate under which the Pratapgad fort falls was issuing security passes for mediapersons. A clerk took down our details. When he asked my name, he began smiling. But he almost fell off his chair laughing when he found out that the OB van engineer’s name was Shivaji Patil. ‘Ekdum Afzal Khan aani Shivaji jodiney aalat (So, Afzal Khan and Shivaji are travelling together),’ he’d laughed,” says Khan.
Muslims alone are not faced with the name conundrum. Jaydev Singh Rathod, 30, a banker who lives in Borivli, remembers how elders in his Agnihotri Rajput family had baulked at his Tamil Brahmin wife Padma’s suggestion for a name for his firstborn. “She suggested Meera, thinking it’d have the right Rajput ring to it and would come across as an olive branch to my parents, who had bitterly opposed our marriage.”
It was Rathod’s aunt who later explained that a name like Meera in their community is often the target of derision. “I learnt that it’s still used to disparagingly discipline young girls who show signs of an infatuation,” he points out. “Kyon ri bawli? Badi Meera ho gayi tu? (Are you crazy? Have you become Meera?) is a rebuke young girls often hear.”
But the name still won hands down. “I have to deal with my folks only when I go to Udaipur. But I have to live with my wife. In the interest of peace at home, I went with her suggestion,” he smiles with a knowing wink.

Hachette Books New Titles

 
Ser
ISBN/Code
Title
Publisher
Author
Binding
Curr
Price
Category
1
9781409120841
Citadel
ORION PUBLISHING GROUP
KATE MOSSE
PB
RS.
399
Fiction
2
9780751548174
The Bone Bed
LITTLE BROWN BOOK GROUP
CORNWELL PATRICIA
PB
RS.
399
Thriller
3
9781409144588
Six Years
ORION PUBLISHING GROUP
HARLAN COBEN
PB
RS.
695
Fiction
4
9781444757125
How Do We Fix This Mess?
HACHETTE BOOK GROUP USA
NA
PB
RS.
450
Non-Fiction
5
9780349123158
The Limpopo Academy Of Private Detection
Little Brown
MCCALL SMITH ALEXANDER
PB
RS.
399
Fiction
6
9781409101666
The Utopia Experiment
ORION PUBLISHING GROUP
ROBERT LUDLUM
PB
RS.
695
Fiction
7
9781780223254
THE PRISONER OF HEAVEN
ORION PUBLISHING GROUP
CARLOS RUIZ ZAFON
PB
RS.
399
Fiction
8
9781409139393
Seconds Away
ORION PUBLISHING GROUP
HARLAN COBEN
PB
RS.
399
Fiction
9
9781444766646
The Storyteller
HODDER AND STOUGHTON
JODI PICOULT
PB
RS.
695
Fiction

Monday, May 20, 2013

New Titles

 
Ser
ISBN/Code
Title
Publisher
Author
Binding
Curr
Price
Category
1
9788192691602
To B.E. or Not To B.E.?
Inkpen Publications
Dipen Ambalia
PB
RS.
195
Humor
2
9788172344542
The Virgins
PRAKASH BOOKS
Siddharth Tripathi
PB
RS.
250
Fiction
3
9788172344566
The Great Gatsby
PRAKASH BOOKS
F.SCOTT FITZGERALD
PB
RS.
150
Fiction
4
9789381639788
Thought Leadership Tweet
BLOOMSBURY PUBLISHING PLc,
Lix Alexander
PB
RS.
199
Management
5
9789381639283
Bare Knuckle People Management
BLOOMSBURY PUBLISHING PLc,
ONEIL
PB
RS.
399
Management
6
9789381639252
A Ball of Fire
BLOOMSBURY PUBLISHING PLc,
John Montague
PB
RS.
299
Fiction
7
9789381639245
Absolute Zero Cool
BLOOMSBURY PUBLISHING PLc,
Declan Burke
PB
RS.
299
Fiction

ISBN13
name
AUTHOR1
currency
price
ORDER QTY
PUBLISHER
BINDINGTYPE
CATEGORY
SUBJECT
9780141341767
W.A.R.P.: The Reluctant Assassin
Colfer, Eoin
INR
399

Penguin Puffin (UK)
Tradepaperback
Fiction
CHILDRENS FICTION
9780713992823
MARGARET THATCHER
MOORE CHARLES
INR
899

PENGUIN INDIA
Tradepaperback


9781409364634
Nature Guide Gems
NA
INR
599

PENGUIN DK
Paperback
Others
NATURE
9789381017708
The Madness Of Waiting (Junun-E-Intezar)
Ruswa Muhammad Hadi
INR
395

ZUBAAN
Hardback
Others
FICTION
9781782390893
Night Train To Lisbon
Mercier, Pascal
INR
350

ATLANTIC BOOK
Tradepaperback
Others
FICTION
9780141336138
The Sacrifice
Higson, Charlie
INR
350

PENGUIN UK (PUFFIN)
Paperback
Fiction
CHILDRENS FICTION
9781409364801
The Aircraft Book
NA
INR
1499

PENGUIN DK
Hardback
Others
Aircraft
9781409382447
Complete Dog Care
NA
INR
599

PENGUIN DK
Paperback
Others
Dogs
9781409322337
The Boys Book of Things to Make
NA
INR
699

PENGUIN DK
Hardback
Others
crafts / hobbies
9780141344409
Stars
Jennings Laura & Luke
INR
250

PENGUIN UK (PUFFIN)
Paperback
Fiction
CHILDRENS FICTION
9780141047959
Enemies
Weiner, Tim
INR
699

PENGUIN UK
Paperback
Non Fiction
POLITICS
9780141342733
The Victory Dogs
RIX MEGAN
INR
250

PENGUIN UK (PUFFIN)
Paperback
CHILDREN
Animal Stories



   
Ser
ISBN/Code
Title
Publisher
Author
Binding
Curr
Price
Category
1
9781409120841
Citadel
ORION PUBLISHING GROUP
KATE MOSSE
PB
RS.
399
Fiction
2
9780751548174
The Bone Bed
LITTLE BROWN BOOK GROUP
CORNWELL PATRICIA
PB
RS.
399
Thriller
3
9781409144588
Six Years
ORION PUBLISHING GROUP
HARLAN COBEN
PB
RS.
695
Fiction
4
9781444757125
How Do We Fix This Mess?
HACHETTE BOOK GROUP USA
NA
PB
RS.
450
Non-Fiction
5
9780349123158
The Limpopo Academy Of Private Detection
Little Brown
MCCALL SMITH ALEXANDER
PB
RS.
399
Fiction
6
9781409101666
The Utopia Experiment
ORION PUBLISHING GROUP
ROBERT LUDLUM
PB
RS.
695
Fiction
7
9781780223254
THE PRISONER OF HEAVEN
ORION PUBLISHING GROUP
CARLOS RUIZ ZAFON
PB
RS.
399
Fiction
8
9781409139393
Seconds Away
ORION PUBLISHING GROUP
HARLAN COBEN
PB
RS.
399
Fiction
9
9781444766646
The Storyteller
HODDER AND STOUGHTON
JODI PICOULT
PB
RS.
695
Fiction





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